5900 Waterloo Road, Suite #110 Columbia, MD 21045
Get Directions    443-451-1600

Important News

From The American Academy Of Pediatrics

July 1, 2020
Electronic Documentation in Pediatrics: The Rationale and Functionality Requirements

Clinical documentation has dramatically changed since the implementation and use of electronic health records and electronic provider documentation. The purpose of this report is to review these changes and promote the development of standards and best practices for electronic documentation for pediatric patients. In this report, we evaluate the unique aspects of clinical documentation for pediatric care, including specialized information needs and stakeholders specific to the care of children. Additionally, we explore new models of documentation, such as shared documentation, in which patients may be both authors and consumers, and among care teams while still maintaining the ability to clearly define care and services provided to patients in a given day or encounter. Finally, we describe alternative documentation techniques and newer technologies that could improve provider efficiency and the reuse of clinical data.

July 1, 2020
Digital Advertising to Children

Advertising to children and teenagers is a multibillion-dollar industry. This policy statement reviews the forms of advertising that children and teenagers encounter, including newer forms of digital marketing, such as sponsored content, influencers, data collection, persuasive design, and personalized behavioral marketing driven by machine learning. Parents and pediatric health care providers need to be aware of the ways different marketing messages reach children and teenagers, including Internet sites, social media, and mobile apps. Evidence suggests that exposure to advertising is associated with unhealthy behaviors, such as intake of high-calorie, low-nutrient food and beverages; use of tobacco products and electronic cigarettes; use of alcohol and marijuana; and indoor tanning. Children are uniquely vulnerable to the persuasive effects of advertising because of immature critical thinking skills and impulse inhibition. School-aged children and teenagers may be able to recognize advertising but often are not able to resist it when it is embedded within trusted social networks, encouraged by celebrity influencers, or delivered next to personalized content. This policy statement expresses concern about the practice of tracking and using children’s digital behavior to inform targeted marketing campaigns, which may contribute to health disparities among vulnerable children or populations. Pediatricians should guide parents and children to develop digital literacy skills to prevent or mitigate negative outcomes, but it is equally important that policy makers and technology companies embrace digital design, data collection, and marketing practices within today’s broad digital environment that support healthier decision-making and outcomes.

July 1, 2020
Electronic Documentation in Pediatrics: The Rationale and Functionality Requirements

Clinical documentation is a fundamental component of the practice of medicine. It has significantly evolved over the past decade, largely because of the growth of health information technology and electronic health records. Although government agencies and other professional organizations have published position statements on the structure and use of electronic documentation, few have specifically addressed the documentation needs for the care of children. A policy statement on electronic documentation of clinical care by general pediatric and subspecialist providers by the American Academy of Pediatrics is needed. This statement provides insight on the unmet needs of key stakeholders to direct future research and development of the electronic media necessary to enhance the wellness of children and improve health care delivery. It also addresses the challenges and opportunities for efficient and effective clinical documentation in pediatrics.

July 1, 2020
Advocacy and Collaborative Health Care for Justice-Involved Youth

Children and adolescents who become involved with the justice system often do so with complex medical, mental health, developmental, social, and legal needs. Most have been exposed to childhood trauma or adversity, which both contribute to their involvement with the justice system and negatively impact their health and well-being. Whether youth are held in confinement or in their home communities, pediatricians play a critical role in promoting the health and well-being of justice-involved youth. Having a working knowledge of the juvenile justice system and common issues facing justice-involved youth may help pediatricians enhance their clinical care and advocacy efforts. This policy statement is a revision of the 2011 policy "Health Care for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System." It provides an overview of the juvenile justice system, describes racial bias and overrepresentation of youth of color in the justice system, reviews the health and mental health status of justice-involved youth, and identifies advocacy opportunities for juvenile justice reform.

June 1, 2020
Health Supervision for People With Achondroplasia

Achondroplasia is the most common short-stature skeletal dysplasia, additionally marked by rhizomelia, macrocephaly, midface hypoplasia, and normal cognition. Potential medical complications associated with achondroplasia include lower extremity long bone bowing, middle-ear dysfunction, obstructive sleep apnea, and, more rarely, cervicomedullary compression, hydrocephalus, thoracolumbar kyphosis, and central sleep apnea. This is the second revision to the original 1995 health supervision guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics for caring for patients with achondroplasia. Although many of the previously published recommendations remain appropriate for contemporary medical care, this document highlights interval advancements in the clinical methods available to monitor for complications associated with achondroplasia. This document is intended to provide guidance for health care providers to help identify individual patients at high risk of developing serious sequelae and to enable intervention before complications develop.